• Goldenseal
  • Black Cohosh
  • Laddy Slipper Orchid
  • Trillium
  • Bloodroot
 

Pirates for the Planet

by UpS Executive Director, Susan Leopold

The “At-Risk” Tool made its published debut in 2014 culminating in years of work by many in the UpS community.1 The visionaries of the “At-Risk” tool are former UpS Board Member Kelly Kindscher of the University of Kansas and Lisa Castle, the 2014 Medicinal Plant Conservation Award recipient, of Southwestern Oklahoma State University. The format of the assessment tool was in part patterned after the Blue Oceans Group’s Seafood Mini Guides.2 Similar to plants’ susceptibility to over- harvesting, wild caught seafood is also in deep decline from over-fishing. Vulnerability of species that are wild and in demand depends on many different factors, from intrinsic life history traits to market forces. Based on literature, logic, and discussions with conservation practitioners, five main factors that influence a species’ vulnerability to overharvest were determined: life history, effect of harvest on individual plants, population size, habitat, and demand.3 These five categories are the framework for the tool, and in each section a series of questions leads to a numerical answer, and the total scores then rate a species. The higher the number, the more vulnerable the species is to over-harvesting. In figure one you can see a graph of all the at-risk and to-watch plants that have been reviewed, which illustrates the numerical risk and the colors indicate scores within each of the five main factors.

atriskgraph

American Ginseng Summit

American Ginseng Summit

by Glynis Board, West Virginia Public Radio

United Plant Savers was honored to host the 2014 American Ginseng Summit at our Goldenseal Botanical Sanctuary in Rutland, OH where we discussed safe-guarding wild populations of American ginseng, as well as protecting the

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Disjunct Medicine: A History of the (Two) Mayapple(s)

by Sasha M. White

When Europeans came to North America, the mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum), also called mandrake, raccoon berry or wild lemon, was one of the earliest plants to be noticed. Samuel Champlain noted Huron tribes eating the fruit in 1616,

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Florida’s Threatened Herbs

Florida’s Threatened Herbs

by Emily Ruff

Some 450 miles long and kept humid by the ocean on either side, the state of Florida supports plant species from temperate to tropical, coastal to wetland to upland. Boasting a melting pot of exotic plants naturalized from

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Seeking the Silvestre Romero in Spain

Seeking the Silvestre Romero in Spain

by Susan Leopold

I landed in Spain for the International Congress of Ethnobotany, and as serendipity would have it, the hotel I had booked was in a small square located in what was once the Jewish/Arabic part of Cordoba. Next to

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Ramps Now on the “To-Watch” List

Ramps Now on the “To-Watch” List

by Susan Leopold

Time to Ramp Up Conservation Efforts

Last spring trespassers dug trash bags, laundry baskets and buckets full of ramps (Allium tricoccum) from the woodland ravine of Goldenseal Sanctuary neighbor, Diane DonCarlos.1 Fortunately police responded to a call from Diane,

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Medicinal Plant Conservation Certificate Program

Applications are now being accepted for 2017!

Spring 2017:
Mon. May 1 - Fri. June 9th
Fall 2017:
Tue. Sept. 5 - Fri. Oct. 13

More Information Apply


Gift Memberships Available!

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PO Box 147, Rutland, OH 45775
Tel. (740) 742-3455
Email: office@UnitedPlantSavers.org

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